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FAQ

Below you can find frequently asked questions concerning gas regulators and measurement. 

Q:

WHAT IS A PRV?

A:

A pressure reducing valve.


Q:

WHAT  DOES "LOCK UP" MEAN WHEN TALKING ABOUT REGULATORS?

A:

A lock up regulator is when a regulator has its delivery pressure set while gas is flowing and flow suddenly stopped, a small rise in delivery pressure (lock up) will happen before the regulator seat closes on the orifice fully. The lower the lock up the better the performance of the regulator.


Q:

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MASS FLOW METERS AND STANDARD GAS METERS?

A:

The ranges of thermal mass flow meters for gases are specified in such units as ln/min, sccm or m3n/h. These units look like volumetric units, but in truth they are expressions of Mass Flow. What is the story behind this?

Imagine you have a cylinder of 1 litre, which is closed by means of a moveable piston of negligible weight. This cylinder contains 1 litre of air at ambient pressure, approx. 1 bar. The weight of this volume of air at 0°C is 1.293 g, this is the mass. When we move the piston half way to the bottom of the cylinder, then the contained volume of air is only ½ litre, the pressure is approx. 2 bar, but the mass is unchanged, 1.293 g; nothing has been added, or left out.f

Following this example, mass flow should actually be expressed in units of weight such as g/h, mg/s, etc. Most users, however, think and work in units of volume. No problem, provided conditions are agreed upon, under which the mass is converted to volume. Following the ‘European’ definition, a temperature of 0°C and a pressure of 1,013 bar are selected as “normal” reference conditions, indicated by the underlying letter “n” in the unit of volume used (mln/min, m3n/h). Alternative, a temperature of 20°C and a pressure of 1,013 bar are used to refer to ”standard” reference conditions, indicated by the underlying letter “s” in the unit of volume used (mls/min, m3s/h). Please be aware of this, because if the difference is not considered, it may lead to an error of 7%!

According to the ‘American’ definition the prefix “s” in sccm, slm or scfh refers to ”standard” conditions 101.325 kPa absolute (14.6959 psia) and temperature of 0°C (32°F).

Volumetric measuring devices, like variable area meters or turbine flow meters, are unable to distinguish temperature or pressure changes. Mass flow measurement would require additional sensors for these parameters and a flow computer to compensate for the variations in these process conditions. Thermal mass flow meters are virtually insensitive to variations in temperature or pressure.


Q:

WHY DOES MY METER NEED A SEAL FROM MEASUREMENT CANADA?

A:

If the owner of the meter is billing the user, the meter must be certified by Measurement Canada. This is not necessary if the owner is sub-metering.


Q:

HOW DO I CALCULATE KPA TO PSI?

A:

1 KPA = 0.14503773773020923 PSI


Q:

HOW DO I CALCULATE KW TO BTU'S?

A:

1 kW = 3412.142 BTU/hr


Q:

WHAT IS A PRESSURE DROP?

A:

All regulators have some delivery pressure drop with increased flow rate. The smaller the drop as flow is increased, the better the performance.


Q:

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MBH & SCFH?

A:

1000 BTU/hr requires 1 Cubic foot per hr (1 CFH)

1MBH = 1000 BTU/hr = 1 CFH  


Q:

HOW DO I RESET AN OPCO ON A BRYAN DONKINS?

A:

Please see this PDF.


Q:

HOW IMPORTANT IS PIPE SIZE WHEN IT COMES TO REGULATION AND PRESSURE DROP?

A:

At low pressure gas (ie 7”wc) it’s very important. 

Never exceed:

600 scfh on a ¾” line

1200 scfh on a 1” line

2500 scfh on a 1-1/4” line

7500 scfh on a 1-1/2” line

10,000 scfh on 2” line


Q:

HOW DO I MAINTAIN A LUBRICATED PLUG VALVE?

A:

To help operators get maximum life from lubricated plug valves, the following tips are offered:

1. Plug adjustments should be snug tight enough to keep the plug from becoming unseated, but not to a degree requiring excessive force to operate the valve.

2. Lubrication should be periodic, systematic, and with the proper grade of lubricant.

3. If the valve system is filled, fresh supply of lubricant can easily be forced between the seating surfaces by giving the lubricant screw a few turns. Depletion of lubricant in the system will require the addition of several sticks before lubricant can be forced into the seat. In this instance, lubricant should be added until resistance is felt in turning the screw.

4. Turn the plug slightly when lubricating to assist in the distribution of lubricant and to determine if the adjustment is correct. If the valve is lubricated with the adjustment too loose, it can be corrected by alternately tightening the adjustment and turning the plug. This will work out excess lubricant and permit the plug to return to its proper position in the seat.

5. At the time of adding new lubricant, care should be taken to prevent any solid foreign material from entering into the lubricant space of the valve.


Q:

HOW DO I CONVERT SCFH OF NATURAL GAS TO BTU'S OF PROPANE?

A:

100 scfh NG x 0.63 x2520 = 158760 BTU’S of propane. 

 

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